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  First steps in Latin Grammar  

1. Nouns and verbs

2. Subjects and objects

3. Word order

4. Practice

5. Declensions and cases

6. Nominative and

accusative cases

7. Genitive case

8. Dative case

9. Gender

10. Ablative case

11. Final practice

ANSWERS

 

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6 - The nominative and accusative cases

The nominative case

A noun in the nominative case is the subject of the verb. Names of people and places are known to us today by their nominative form (e.g. Catullus not Catullum, Britannia not Britanniam).

 

The accusative case

The accusative case is used for the object of the verb:

              

It is also used for an object of movement, i.e. a destination or goal of motion (into..., on to..., to..., towards...), usually with a preposition like ad (to, towards) or in (into, on to):

              

Here there are two words in the accusative, the ordinary object and the goal of motion.

 

The ‘object’ of the verb to be

The verb est means is. The ‘object’ of est is not really an object at all. Nothing is ‘done’ to it. Est simply describes the subject, like an adjective does, e.g. the farmer is rich, but the farmer is not a god.

Thus the ‘object’ of the verb to be (called the complement) is in the same case as its subject, usually nominative:


              

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